...Health info at your doorstep

Walnuts, Olive Oil Could Prevent Food Poisoning

Omega-3 fatty acids, found in the aforementioned foods, reduce the bacteria’s ability to cause infection by ‘switching off’ its genes, the study found.Not killing the bacteria may be beneficial, as they only develop resistance when their growth is threatened, the researchers said.
Study author Professor Birgitte Kallipolitis, from the University of Southern Denmark, said: “It’s interesting that naturally occurring, completely harmless and actually healthy fatty acids can be used to suppress dangerous bacteria such as listeria.
“The long-term perspective is that it may prove possible to develop new treatment methods – not only against listeria, but also against other dangerous bacteria that are currently resistant to antibiotics.”
Researchers from the University of Southern Denmark tested varying omega-3 concentrations on L. monocytogenes in the lab. Results, published in the journal Research in Microbiology, revealed that within 30 minutes of their administration, low omega-3 concentrations had an effect on the bacteria that could lead to new listeriosis treatments, according to the researchers.
The fatty acid ‘switched off’ certain genes that are responsible for L. monocytogenes’ ability to cause infection, the study found. Study author Professor Birgitte Kallipolitis, from the University of Southern Denmark, said: ‘It’s interesting that naturally occurring, completely harmless and actually healthy fatty acids can be used to suppress dangerous bacteria such as listeria.
“The long-term perspective is that it may prove possible to develop new treatment methods – not only against listeria, but also against other dangerous bacteria that are currently resistant to antibiotics,” Medical News Today reported.
The researchers also noted that omega-3 not killing L. monocytogenes may be beneficial, as bacteria only establish new survival strategies that make them resistant to attack when their growth is threatened.
The researchers hope that their findings fuel the development of new strategies to tackle listeria and other bacteria that are becoming resistant to antibiotics.
This comes after a leading food scientist and travel sickness researcher said ‘traveller’s diarrhoea’ is always the result of food poisoning and not exposure to new food or water.
 The Guardian News

Comment Here

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.